5 Lessons For Aspiring Young Entrepreneurs From Sawyer Howitt

Possessing the rare ability to pinpoint the intersection between business needs and consumer desires, Sawyer Howitt is highly qualified to help aspiring entrepreneurs of all ages realize their goals.

Sawyer Hoowitt a project manager of Meriwether Group. A racquetball player and graduate of Lincoln High School. He loves supporting charitable organization.

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Here are five pieces of advice aimed at young entrepreneurs starting out on their business journeys:

1. Start Now

Many young entrepreneurs are hesitant to start their businesses, deterred a fear of being too inexperienced and not old enough. What they lack in experience, however, young entrepreneurs can make up for with the energy, perspective and sheer amount of time that their age affords. These resources can be used to put in the hours necessary to hone your craft, refine ideas and ultimately make up for the age gap.

2. Find the Right People for the Job (and Make Them Happy)

As you grow your business, its needs, including the kind of employees it demands, will make themselves clear to you. Making sure someone is a good fit not just for the position but for the company culture is crucial. Once you find the right people, keeping them happy is just as important. Keep them in your corner by rewarding hard work and set aside time for fun, relaxing office events.

3. Stay Focused

If you are an imaginative person with an endless stream of ideas, it is easy to lose sight of one great thought when another pops into your head. Keep track of all your ideas by writing them down, but zero in on one with laser focus.

4. Be Mindful of the Numbers

When most aspiring entrepreneurs think of numbers, they think of cash. While it is clear that you have to keep an eye on your costs, it is perhaps equally important to be aware of key performance indicators or KPIs. KPIs include things like conversion rate of customers to warm leads and are essential to understanding what drives results for your business.

5. Be a People Person

Entrepreneurship is a social game. To win, you have to gracefully communicate with employees, vendors and potential investors. If you tend to veer towards the shy side, you can either force yourself to be more social or find a trustworthy partner who will do the talking for you and your business.

Learn more about Sawyer Howitt: http://www.r2sports.com/website/media-report.asp?TID=13700&UID=230192&resultsOption=byPlayer&reportType=results​